• What Are Cocktail Bitters and How Should You Use Them?

    What Are Cocktail Bitters and How Should You Use Them?

Liqueurs, spirits, wines: you’ve probably heard of all of them. There’s not much in the world of alcohol that you don’t know right? Enter: bitters. Bitters are one the lesser known sides to mixology, but an ingredient that’s essential to achieving many of the greatest drinks of all time. From the Old Fashioned to Manhattans, learn what bitters are and how to use them to elevate some of your favourite drinks.

What Are Bitters?

The best way to think about bitters is as a liquid spice. Just as you’d add turmeric and cumin to create a flavourful curry, you add bitters to a drink to create depth and new dimensions. Spicy, herbal, and sometimes fruity, they’re a great addition to a huge array of drinks! Traditional bitters are alcoholic, though you can also find non-alcoholic versions that are wonderful for virgin drinks.

Bitters have been made and used for thousands of years, dating all the way back to ancient Egypt. Typically, they’re made by adding spices and herbs to spirits and leaving them to infuse before straining, adding a lot of flavour to small amounts of alcohol. 

There are three main types of bitters; Angostura bitters, Peychaud’s bitters, and flavoured bitters.

What Are Angostura Bitters?

When talking about bitters, most mixologists will think of Angostura Bitters, which are the classic version of this alcoholic ingredient. Aromatic with notes of clove and cinnamon, they’re fairly bitter (hence the name!) and add a more herbal, spicy note to drinks. 

What Are Peychaud’s Bitters?

Peychaud’s Bitters are less common but are a must in the Sazerac cocktail. These are sweeter than Angostura Bitters and have notes of cherry and orange, making for a fruitier overall flavour.

What Are Flavoured Bitters?

Flavoured bitters aren’t traditional, but are super fun to work with. Less aromatic, they’re made with a huge variety of profiles that’ll suit different cocktails. You can find chocolate, vanilla, grapefruit, and ginger bitters, amongst many more!

How to Use Bitters in Alcoholic Drinks

When exploring the world of mixology, the first time you find bitters will be an exciting one! They create a whole new level of cocktails and are incredibly fun, adding new and unique flavours to old classics.

There are some drinks that rely on bitters. It’s a good idea to start with these first, introducing you to bitters in a way that we know works. For example, an Old Fashioned uses Angostura Bitters to add herbal, warm notes to the drink. 

Once you’ve created a few cocktail recipes that rely on bitters, you can start to become more adventurous. Add chocolate bitters to Vermouth and cherry bitters to vodka, experimenting with what works and what doesn’t. Have fun with it! After all, that’s what mixology is all about.

Discover Bitters at UrbanBar

Our mixologists at UrbanBar love using bitters to spice up our drinks, and we’ve hand-selected a premium range to bring to you. From fruity notes to seasonally-inspired infusions, browse the full range of high-quality bitters and be inspired for your next drinks.

Share on

  • Neat, Up, Straight Up, or Straight? How to Serve Your Drinks
    By Nick Andrews on

    Neat, Up, Straight Up, or Straight? How to Serve Your Drinks

    There’s no denying that the world of mixology is full of jargon. If there’s one thing we mixologists know (aside from how to mix a perfect drink, of course), it’s...

  • Are 'Ready to Drink Cocktails' The Next Big Thing?
    By Nick Andrews on

    Are 'Ready to Drink Cocktails' The Next Big Thing?

    When you’re mixing yourself a drink at home, you don’t always want a simple G&T or Whiskey on the rocks; But, mustering up the motivation to create a full-on cocktail...

  • The Best Low-Sugar Cocktails
    By Nick Andrews on

    The Best Low-Sugar Cocktails

    To prove that cocktails can be just as good without sugar, we’ve put together some delicious recipes you need to try. With some clever tricks up our sleeves, these low-sugar...

Greenspark Public Impact Profile